DESCRIBE THE BASIC STRUCTURE OF THE STORY AND IN THE FOLLOWING SENTENCES YOU WILL DESCRIBE THE SIMILARITIES OR INCONSISTENCIES IN REPORTING FROM VARIOUS PERIODICALS.

DESCRIBE THE BASIC STRUCTURE OF THE STORY AND IN THE FOLLOWING SENTENCES YOU WILL DESCRIBE THE SIMILARITIES OR INCONSISTENCIES IN REPORTING FROM VARIOUS PERIODICALS.

 
You will analyze five stories either periodically or pictorially from three different article sources. You will read the articles/pictures and attach the links or the photographs representing the story you have chosen. In one sentence you will describe the basic structure of the story and in the following sentences you will describe the similarities or inconsistencies in reporting from various periodicals. The differences you are looking for can come from the way actors or states in the story are described, from the vantage point of the story (capitalist, realist, liberal, Marxist, conservative, state-based, individual-based etc. ), or from the editorial byline of the periodical (i.e. does the bias of the periodical stand out in their reporting, when compared to other stories?)
click here for more information on this paper
** The homework instructions are at the end of the file I have attached.

Attachments:
San Francisco State University
Fall 2014
IR 104 (04): Introduction to World Affairs
Days/Time M: 610-855 Room: HSS 317
Office Hours: MW 4-6 (HSS 387- For now, Skype, Text, or email is the best method of contact.)
Course description
This is an introductory course for students looking to establish a competence in international politics and international theory. This course examines in detail a wide range of issues, including: the bedeviling role of insurgencies, interstate and civil wars, terrorism, international efforts to contain violent conflict, military interventions, human rights, the problem of economic development, the functioning and effectiveness of international institutions, and the global environment. While theory will be touched on at some points, this course uses International Relations theory as a jumping off point to approach real-world problems and puzzles Those wishing to immerse themselves more deeply in the International Relations theory and academic development are encouraged to build on the understanding gained in this course by taking one of the theory seminars offered by the department.click here for more information on this paper
Course Aims and Objectives
This course aims: … to introduce students to the study of International Politics, with an emphasis on historicizing current issues, ideas, and institutions in international affairs; … to encourage students to ask critical questions about the way in which issues and identities are represented by political elites, scholars, and the media; … to help students establish links between the ways we think (theory) about international affairs and their day–‐to–‐ day lives (practice) in a thoroughly, but unequally, globalized world; … to guide students in developing their own analyses of world politics –‐ to articulate their ideas in a coherent manner, supported by empirical evidence and consistent argument.
On completion of this class, students should be able:
…to demonstrate general knowledge of world politics and the connections between “the
World out there” and their own lives; … to identify key concepts and institutions of international affairs and how they have developed historically; … to describe and debate, in depth, the features of particular case studies examined in the class; … to gather, and critically evaluate, material from media, government and other sources of information; … to organize and synthesize large amounts of often contradictory and uneven source material; … to state and justify their opinions and analyses of world politics.
Grading
Your course evaluation will be based upon: map quizzes, mid-term exam, class participation, a portfolio, and a final exam. Here is the breakdown:
Map Quizzes (20%) 100 Points
Mid-term exam (20%) 100 points
Final Exam (20%) 100 points
Class participation (20%) 100 points
Portfolio (20%) 100 points
Total: 500 Points
The grading scale will be as follows:
A= 475 or above B-=415-424 D+=335-364
A-=465-474 C+=385-414 D=325-334
B+=435-464 C=375-384 D-=315-324
B=425-434 C-=365-374 F=314-and below
Reading materials:
Jenny Edkins, Maja Zehfuss, (2014), Global Politics: A New Introduction, 2nd edition, Routledge. (Referred to as GP in Assigned Readings).
Purchase of the text is required.
All additional reading materials will either be linked to through ILearn or will be on online reserve through the library. It is often cheaper to rent the book using either the campus bookstore or an Amazon Kindle EReader for PC, MAC, or Android OS.
In addition, keeping up with developments in international politics is a constant process, so access to the New York Times, the Washington Post, The Guardian, Al Jazeera, or the Wall Street Journal, etc. is an absolute must. We will discuss access to media and finding good sourcing on the internet and in print during the second week, if you have any questions please feel free to ask!
Course Rules
The following rules govern the requirements for this course:
Make-up exams are given only under extraordinary circumstances. The nature & timing of exam will be determined by the instructor. Students are strongly urged to avoid make-up tests by taking regular exams.
Failure to take any one of the exams results in a failing grade for the course.
Instructor reserves the right to use his discretion in instances of extreme emergency or serious illness. Appropriate documentation must be provided by students in either event.
Additional notes:
Academic dishonesty will be penalized by taking appropriate action including, but not limited to, adjusting the final grade for the course. If you have any questions regarding this situation, please feel free to talk them over with the instructor. Also students with disabilities who need reasonable accommodations are encouraged to contact the instructor early in the semester. The Disability Programs and Resource Center (DPRC) is available to facilitate the reasonable accommodations process. The DPRC, located in SSB 110, can be reached by telephone at 338-2472 (voice/TTY) or by email at dprc@sfsu.edu.
Reading and assignment schedule
All readings MUST be done prior to the first meeting of the week (excepting, of course, the first week of class).
Week 1-Welcome and Introductions (August 25).
GP, Introduction, Chap 1.
September 1 (No Class)
Week 2- Situating ourselves within Global Politics and IR, Finding Sources. (September 8)
GP, Chap 8 (Lisle) and 9 (Franklin).
Week 3- What is Identity? How does it affect politics? Why are there countries? (September 15)
GP, Chap 5 (Wibben), 12 (Barabantseva), and 13 (Shapiro) click here for more information on this paper
EUROPE MAP QUIZ, Second SESSION!
Week 4- Terrorism and the Ticking time bomb (September 22)
GP, Chap 2 (Pin-Fat) and 7 (Edkins)
Week 5- US Intervention and state-sponsored violence (September 29).
GP, Chap 23 (Amoore and de Goede) and 24 (Dillon)
PRESENTATON PROPOSAL DUE
Week 6- The Role of religion in Global Politics and Midterm Review (October 6).
GP, Chap 6 (Mandaville)
“The Clash of Civilizations” (Huntington) (Provided on ILearn)
“The Clash of Ignorance” (Said)
Recommended “Forget 9/11” (2010) Zehfuss
Week 7- Midterm (October 13)
NORTH AFRICA/MIDDLE EAST MAP QUIZ INCLUDED IN MIDTERM!
Week 8- Environmental Issues (October 20)
GP, Chap 3 (Dalby) 4 (Death)
“The Great Pacific Garbage Patch: Pacific Trash Vortex”, National Geographic: Education.
“The Tragedy of the Commons” (1968) Hardin (provided on ILearn).
Week 9- Human Rights (October 27)
GP, Chap 25 (Orford) and 27 (Shani)
Ghosts of Rwanda Greg Barker, (PBS, 2004)
AFRICA MAP QUIZ- SECOND MEETING
Week 10- International Institutions and the UN (November 3).
GP Chap 26 (Bleiker)
“The UN Security Council, Indifference, and Genocide in Rwanda”, (2008) Barnett (provided on ILearn).
Oooh dear, Halloween on a Friday(!), be safe out there, kids.
Week 11- Colonialism, Imperialism, and Post-Colonialism (November 10).
GP Chap 10 (Doty), 11 (Elden), 16 (Krishna), and 21 (Inayatullah)
SOUTH AMERICA MAP QUIZ- SECOND MEETING
Week 12- Ending Poverty and Recognizing Slavery (November 17)
GP Chap 15 (Manzo) and 20 (Pasha)
CENTRAL AMERICA MAP QUIZ- SECOND MEETING
Thanksgiving recess 24-28
Week 13- The Global Economy and IPE, (December 1).
GP, Chap 19 (Cammack) and 17 (Petersen).
SOUTH AND EAST ASIA MAP QUIZ- SECOND MEETING
Week 14- Conclusions and Final Exam Review (December 8)
Week 15- Final Exam (610-855p 12/15).
ASIA MAP QUIZ INCLUDED IN FINAL
Second Term Paper and Portfolio due End of Finals Week (Friday, 12/19/2014)
Details and Supplemental Information for Course Assignments
Portfolio Assignment- Details
Portfolio Assignment and Description (All 5 Stories Due- Finals Week- via email):
Description: the portfolio is the closest we get to homework in this course. You will analyze a single story either periodically or pictorially from three different article sources. You will read the articles/pictures and attach the links or the photographs representing the story you have chosen. In one sentence you will describe the basic structure of the story and in the following sentences you will describe the similarities or inconsistencies in reporting from various periodicals. The differences you are looking for can come from the way actors or states in the story are described, from the vantage point of the story (capitalist, realist, liberal, Marxist, conservative, state-based, individual-based etc. ), or from the editorial byline of the periodical (i.e. does the bias of the periodical stand out in their reporting, when compared to other stories?)  click here for more information on this paper
Objective: To critically analyze a single story from multiple periodical vantage points (at least three).
Number of Stories: 5
Format: Below I have included a sample of the photojournal, the article-based option can have the same format. A third option is also available. If the written assignment is not in your wheelhouse, another option is to take the 5 stories (either pictorially or periodically at least three articles or pictures per story), you have completed throughout the semester and post a short PowerPoint-assisted, video podcast. A completed podcast should do effectively what you written assignment would otherwise do throughout the semester: briefly introduce each story and note the differences and similarities in the reporting of each story. Representing this visually can be a challenging and engaging way to complete the assignment.
Past students have posted videos to Youtube and simply turned in the link as their portfolio, others have used programs on the MAC and PC to generate their videos. I have used PowerPoint video linked through a program called Camtasia, so, this is the one I am most familiar with but I would be willing to try to learn whatever you need to complete the assignment. Let me know how I can help you to get this done. The format for your citations for the article can be found here (http://libguides.tulane.edu/content.php?pid=6016&sid=2732305), the photographs only require the link. The preferred structure for citations is Harvard Referencing Style the description of which can be found in the link above.
Where to look for sources:
http://www.foreignpolicy.com/ Foreign Policy is a news magazine that is published by the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR). Those that are skeptical of the CFR, its motives, and history have every reason to be dubious about the validity of this magazine as a source, however, I think it is a useful starting point in asking important questions about news and foreign affairs. The magazine also will send tailored emails every morning about issues important to our area of study. Peruse the website, find the Middle East Brief, or the FP daily briefing and see if it fits your notion of how news should be gathered, it is an important resource, if only as a starting point.
Several Periodicals (be skeptical of editiorial byline, but feel free to use)
The Washington Post http://www.washingtonpost.com/
The New York Times http://www.nytimes.com/
Politico (American News site, it can be valuable for Foreign Policy purposes). http://www.politico.com/ (While I would by no means require you to link your email to these, much like FB or Twitter, Politico has several early morning emails that can serve as the basis for further media exploration, specifically The Huddle, Playbook, and the E-Ring (Defense Department- focused).
Europe- click here for more information on this paper
Der Spigel (Germany) – http://www.spiegel.de/international/
BBC (The UK)- http://www.bbc.com/
Le Monde- http://mondediplo.com/
Latin America
Argentina- http://www.buenosairesherald.com/
Boliva- http://boliviatimes.com/
(Two very, very different perspectives on LA politics)
Middle East-
Al Jazeera (English or if possible Arabic) http://america.aljazeera.com/
Haaretz (Israeli- Left) http://www.haaretz.com/
Arutz Sheva (Israeli- Right-Center) http://www.israelnationalnews.com/
The Jerusalem Post (Israeli- Right) http://www.jpost.com/
The Times of Israel (Israeli- Center) http://www.timesofisrael.com/
The Lebanese Daily Star (A good daily with a searchable archive) http://www.dailystar.com.lb/
Al Ahram (Egypt) http://english.ahram.org.eg/Index.aspx
Al Aribiya http://english.alarabiya.net/
For Africa I have contacted some of Afr-icanist colleagues (a subset of comparative politics) and they have responded that while there are papers in Africa they are mostly local in focus, so if some of you have specific interests in a given county, A) let me know about it, and B) ask for sources.
I am still looking for well rounded Asia sources and would invite discussion on the issue. Yes, the subcontinent of Asia, I don’t have reliable sources for India, or China, although I do have a couple for S. Korea (http://www.koreaherald.com/ ; http://english.chosun.com/) I’d be interested to hear any suggestions from the class.
Another way to cut these sources is to ‘like’ them on FB or follow them on Twitter, while I would not require the use of your personal accounts for research or class purposes some of you may find this to be an easier way to stay current.
Sample Photojournal:
Jonathon Whooley, Photojournal (Class ID IR 104), Story #1
Caption: In this citizen journalism image provided by Aleppo Media Center (AMC), an anti-Assad activist group, which has been authenticated based on its contents and other AP reporting, a Syrian boy weeps over the coffin of his mother who was killed following a Syrian government airstrike in Aleppo, Jan. 31, 2014.
http://america.aljazeera.com/topics/topic/categories/international.html
Caption (First Line): Syrian government helicopters and warplanes unleashed a wave of airstrikes on more than a dozen opposition-held neighborhoods in the northern city of Aleppo on Sunday, firing missiles and dropping crude barrel bombs in a ferocious attack that killed at least 36 people, including 17 children, activists said.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/middle_east/al-qaida-fighters-in-syria-kill-rival-rebel-leader/2014/02/02/fec7d53e-8be1-11e3-a760-a86415d0944d_story.html
click here for more information on this paper
Caption (1st Line): Syrian government forces have launched an offensive in recent weeks on rebel-held areas of Aleppo
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-26008512
Story: On February 2, the Assad regime through its armed forces dropped munitions, described as “cylinders packed with explosives and shrapnel” on the citizens of the Syrian city of Aleppo (Al Jazeera, February 2, 2014) Through a series of pictures, shown above, we observe the fact that the Syrian government used barrel bombs on a civilian population to achieve military goals in the city of Aleppo. Notice in the Al Jazeera coverage we see a very personal portrayal of an individual child, young person, mourning the loss of their family member. The caption tells us a far more personal story. The Washington Post shows us scenes of civilians digging out after the attack and we note that the story the caption tells is of domestic warfare, not , as the Al Jazeera photo shows, an anti-Assad activist group. Al Jazeera seems to note or describe a political scene as well as the personal tragedy of the story. Finally, the BBC shows us a scene of a population caught in the midst of fighting with a family fleeing the rubble and wreckage of a recent assault. Note specifically the use of military terms like ‘forces’ and ‘offensive’, which draws the reader into longer running conflict rather than an individual incident.
THE ARTICLE VERSION OF THE PORTFOLIO WILL EFFECTIVELY BE THE SAME FORMAT BUT INSTEAD OF PICTURES YOUR WILL INCLUDE THE HARVARD STYLE CITATIONS FOR EACH ARTICLE. THE SAME ANALYSIS IS CONDUCTED IN BOTHER.
 

"Is this question part of your assignment? We Can Help!"