DEFINE AND APPLY BASIC TERMS AND CONCEPTS OF GROUP DYNAMICS THEORY TO SETTINGS IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR;

DEFINE AND APPLY BASIC TERMS AND CONCEPTS OF GROUP DYNAMICS THEORY TO SETTINGS IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR;

Significant Learning Outcomes Rubric (15 pts)
1) describe your learning outcome using your original proposed assessment/measure,
2) explain whether/how your objective changed at all during the quarter, and
3) 3-5 theoretical concepts from the course readings/discussions that made an impact on selected aspects of your significant learning objectives.
Significant Learning Objectives assignment.
Foundational knowledge
   Ability to define the terms and utilize them in the group seminar.
Application
   Providing accurate data to my team help them to complete the project
Integration

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Understand the academic disciplines and combine them to complete the project
Human dimension
Give your time and your attention to complete the work in your group

  • Helping others
  • Listen and interrupt in the right way

Caring

  • Participate in the group discussions
  • Looking for extra information if we had to

Learning how to learns

  • Trying many times till you reach out your goals.
  • Study about suggestion that you make, and try to make it better for the team.

    CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, EAST BAY

    DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS & ADMINISTRATION
     
    PUAD 6869 – Special Topics:
    Small Group Process in Large Public Organizations
     
     

    Michael Y. Moon, Ph.D. Fall 2014
    Office: MI 4127, Tel: (510) 885-2545 Class Schedule: Wed 6:30-10:00PM in MI 3060
    Office Hours:Tue 2:00-4:30PM & 5:15-6:15PM
    Wed 1:30-4:30PM (except 10/1, 10/15, 11/5, 11/19, 12/3) & 5:15-6:15PM, or by appointment
    Prerequisites: N/A 
    Email: michael.moon@csueastbay.edu

     
     

    Course Learning Objectives and Philosophy:

     
    Upon completing this course, the successful student will be able to:
     

    • Define and apply basic terms and concepts of group dynamics theory to settings in the public sector;
    • Understand and explain how paradox, inter/intrapersonal dynamics, and the social constructedness of knowledge problematize rational management of group process;
    • Analyze small group processes in context of large public organizations; and
    • Integrate course materials and experiences from other courses in the MPA program with group dynamics theory.

     
    The class meetings will take on a graduate seminar format with less emphasis on lectures and more emphasis on student discussions that integrate the reading materials from this and previous courses. This course is designed to encourage learning through active involvement and, consequently, all classes will involve active participation. Please make sure you read the assigned readings prior to class. This is essential for active class participation.
     
    Please ask questions if you are unsure of anything.
     
     
    Applying the ‘Significant Learning’ Approach:
     
    The notion of ‘significant learning’ was first developed by L. Dee Fink[*]. Dr. Fink argues that learning in higher education must make a personal impact for the student that leads to change in order for the learning to be deeply meaningful, memorable, and significant. With this in mind, he developed a taxonomy of significant learning that specifies components of personally meaningful learning. They are as follows (with Fink’s definitions):
     

    • Foundational Knowledge – Understanding and remembering information and ideas. Provides the basic understanding that is necessary for other kinds of learning.
    • Application – Skills, thinking (critical, creative, and practical), managing projects. Allows other kinds of learning to become useful.
    • Integration – Connecting ideas, people, realms of life. The act of making new connections gives learners a new form of power, especially intellectual power.
    • Human Dimension – Learning about oneself and others. This kind of learning informs students about the human significance of what they are learning.
    • Caring – Developing new feelings, interests, and values. When students care about something, they then have the energy for learning more about it and making it a part of their lives. Without the energy for learning, nothing significant happens.
    • Learning How to Learn – Learning how to become a better student, inquire about a subject, and self-direct one’s continued learning.

     
    For this course, I would like us to develop significant learning objectives, using this framework, and measurable outcomes for each of you. Some of the learning objectives will be standard for the course (e.g., understanding and applying the concepts from the readings and class discussions; involving foundational knowledge, application, integration, human dimension, learning how to learn). But this will also require each of you to make a commitment to identify some learning objectives for yourselves and to design a method for you to assess (e.g., measure) your learning outcome on these objectives. I would like your objectives to touch upon all of these taxonomy areas. Moreover, I invite you to integrate your progress on your learning objectives throughout the quarter into our class discussions.
     
    Of course, the components of this taxonomy are not mutually exclusive, but they help us articulate some important areas for learning and development that are also important in the context of the MPA program. Ultimately, in this program designed for public servants, more than cognitive learning objectives are required. Because we are also interested in participatory processes, social equity and justice, ethical responsibility, and critical thinking and praxis, our presence as practitioners with personal values, interests, perspectives, and histories also need to be taken into account. The significant learning taxonomy begins to touch upon the broad areas of learning necessary to grow as reflexive public service practitioners.
     
    Some examples of typical educational goals corresponding to each significant learning taxonomy area include (Fink, 2003):
     

    • Foundational Knowledge:
      • Basic knowledge of the course topic and ability to use terms and concepts
      • Conceptual understanding of the general rationales and philosophies behind the course topic
    • Application:
      • Critical thinking
      • Practical thinking, problem-solving and decision-making capabilities
      • Creativity, using foundational knowledge to develop new ideas
      • Managing complex projects, coordinating multiple tasks using knowledge from the course
      • Performance skills
    • Integration:
      • Interdisciplinary learning, connecting different disciplines
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      • Learning communities, expanding one’s practice to collaborate with others using knowledge
      • Learning and living/working, connecting different ‘realms’ of one’s life
    • Human Dimension:
      • Ethics
      • Serving others (a central value of our department), contributing to the well-being of others at various levels of society
      • Self-authorship, learning how to create and take responsibility for one’s life
      • Working as a member of a team
      • Citizenship, being a responsible citizen of one’s local community and nation
      • Environmental ethics
    • Caring:
      • Become excited about a particular activity or subject
      • Developing a commitment to live/work ‘right’
      • Intrinsic interest in an area of inquiry
    • Learning How to Learn:
      • How to inquire and construct knowledge
      • How to pursue self-directed learning and develop oneself as a reflexive practitioner

     
     

    Course Requirements:

     

    1. Class Participation (40 pts.): Students are expected to be present and on time for each session, to have completed assigned readings, and to fully participate in group discussion and activities. Simply attending in-person classes without active participation (more on this, below) throughout the duration of the course will not be sufficient for receiving a “passing” participation grade.

     
    You will engage with others in the class through discussing assigned readings, analyzing case studies, participating in on-line communications, in-class exercises, and applying diagnostic tools to organizations. Also, by engaging in class activities and discussions you will gain a better understanding of the practical relevance of the material. Your contribution is also extremely valuable in highlighting different perspectives and approaches to the situations we will be analyzing. That means that if you miss class, you miss assignment-related work. If you need to miss more than one class, I suggest you take the course in another quarter.
     
     

    1. Significant Learning Objectives and Outcomes (5+15 pts.): For the second class meeting, submit a bullet-point list of your course specific learning objectives for the course, using the significant learning taxonomy described earlier. List at least one learning objective specific to the content of this course for each of the six taxonomy categories. Also, for each objective, propose how you intend to assess/measure your learning. This assessment may be qualitative or quantitative, but make sure that the measure addresses whether or not you have reached your objective.

     
    Your assessment method must include an identifiable “hurdle” that will allow you to unequivocally determine whether your criteria/criterion for learning success had been achieved by the end of the quarter. Qualitative examples include: “I took up an uncharacteristic leadership role for the fieldwork project and used the Mini Reflective Journals to reflect on the experience” and “I developed an analytical report of a recent reorganization in my department based on course readings and shared it with my manager.” Quantitative examples include: “I conducted 3 sessions of library research and identified 5 additional readings on [topic of interest]” and “I am able to list 5 areas of concern for change agents in the public sector discussed in this course and ways that my organization could address them.” Upload in Microsoft Word file format (.rtf, .doc or .docx) by 6:30PM Pacific Time on the scheduled date of the second class meeting on Blackboard under Submit Assignments (5 pts).
     
    On the scheduled date of the finals week class, please submit the outcomes of your earlier Significant Learning Objectives assignment. For each of your original learning objectives, please: 1) describe your learning outcome using your original proposed assessment/measure, 2) explain whether/how your objective changed at all during the quarter, and 3) 3-5 theoretical concepts from the course readings/discussions that made an impact on selected aspects of your significant learning objectives. Upload in Microsoft Word file format (.rtf, .doc or .docx) by 10:00PM Pacific Time on the scheduled date of the finals week class on Blackboard under Submit Assignments (15 pts). We will discuss this in greater detail in class.
     
     

    1. Project – TBD (40 pts.): As explained in the first class, this is to be defined through our own group process, which, as you are aware, is an example of a small/medium-sized group exploration in the context of a large public organization. We will establish concrete definitions of this component of the course in the second class meeting; the date for finalizing the requirements (including, hopefully, a grading rubric) will be up for discussion.

     
     
    Criteria for each assignment will be discussed in class. The standards listed below are designed to provide guidelines for students aiming to achieve a final course grade of A- or A. Students should:
     

    • Demonstrate s/he has achieved the course objectives.
    • Receive A’s or A-’s on the majority of your assignments.
    • Be regularly prepared for class by completing the class readings and any other required activities.
    • Actively participate in class discussions in thoughtful way. Effective active participation means ensuring your comments:
    • Are relevant to the discussion,
    • Challenge the assumptions of the materials presented and use external resources to enhance your learning,
    • Add to the discussion rather than regurgitate ideas,
    • Take into consideration the input of others,
    • Show a willingness to test ideas and offer different perspectives.

    Active participation also means being able to discuss, question, synthesize, and/or critique ideas from the readings for each class. Obviously, you must be present in class in order to participate, so attendance will be included as a component of your participation grade. Please note: Regularly arriving late to class will adversely affect your participation grade. Your participation grade will be based on these factors.

    • Demonstrate a positive attitude towards the class, fellow students, and faculty. This includes respect, openness to ideas and feedback, and a willingness to contribute and share information. I’m not asking you to be false or not yourself, but I am asking for a respectful decorum and overall professional approach to our work together. Have fun learning and helping your classmates learn!

     
    Final class grades will be based on the following point totals accumulated in the quarter:
     

    Points Grade
    100 – 95 A
    94 – 90 A-
    89 – 85 B+
    84 – 80 B
    79 – 75 B-
    74 – 70 C+
    69 – 65 C
    64 – 60 C-
    59 – 55 D+
    54 – 50 D

     
     
    Course Resources:
     
    These readings are required:
     
    Hirschhorn, L. (1990). The workplace within: Psychodynamics of organizational life. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
     
    Smith, K. K., & Berg, D. N. (1987). Paradoxes of group life: Understanding conflict, paralysis, and movement in group dynamics. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Publishers.
     
    The required textbooks should be available in the CSUEB bookstore. I will occasionally make other pertinent materials available through Blackboard.
     
     
    Academic Integrity:
     
    Academic integrity is fundamental to the activities and principles of a university, a cornerstone of the context in which our learning will take place. All members of the academic community must be confident that each person’s work has been responsibly and honorably acquired, developed, and presented. The academic community regards academic dishonesty as an extremely serious matter, with serious consequences that range from probation to expulsion. All of the work you present as your own, must be your own and not the work of another student or author. When in doubt about plagiarism, paraphrasing, quoting or collaboration, please consult me.
     
    It is the policy of the Public Affairs and Administration Department and of California State University East Bay to treat cheating and/or plagiarism as a very serious offense.  The University Catalog states that students who cheat or plagiarize may be expelled, suspended, placed on probation, or given a lesser sanction.  Plagiarism is defined as:
     

    • Purchasing or borrowing papers from any source.
    • Recycling your own paper from another class.
    • Submitting a paper that someone else has written for you.
    • Copying more than four consecutive words without citing your source.
    • Paraphrasing without giving credit for ideas (except on an exam).
    • Copying work from other students (or permitting another student to copy your work).
    • Rewriting an author’s sentences with new words while maintaining the author’s basic ideas and sentence structure.

     
    Work of other authors should be cited in your papers, e.g., (Adams, 1989; Brown, 1999, p. 129) with page numbers if you are quoting directly. Work should include a references list, in alphabetical order, as follows:
     
    Adams, A. (1989). Administration Ahoy. San Francisco, CA: Cody Press.
    Brown, B. (1999). Jeeves: The quintessential “B Player.” American Management Journal, 27(6), 123-133.

    Please use APA Publication Manual (American Psychological Association, 2001) format (or another standard) when citing references and compiling reference lists. The following website provides a wide variety of APA style examples: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/research/r_apa.html. You can also refer to the APA Publication Manual in the library for additional help.

     
     
    Communication:
     
    Please come and talk to me if you have any questions, are having difficulty with the material, or would like to discuss any issues in more depth. I am available during office hours or we can schedule an appointment. You can email me or phone my office number. If I am not there, I will respond as soon as I can, so please leave a message. Timely communication is important.
     
    ADA:
     
    If you have a documented disability and wish to discuss academic accommodations, or if you would need assistance in the event of an emergency, please contact me as soon as possible and notify the Student Disability Resource Center. Reasonable efforts will be made to accommodate your special needs.
     
     

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    Date
     
    Assignments Due Readings
    Week 1
    Sep 24
     
    None
    Week 2
    Oct 1
     
     
     *** Significant Learning Objectives Due ***
     
    Hirschhorn: Ch. 1 (pp. 19-30), 8 (pp. 162-181)
     
    Smith & Berg: Ch. 1 (pp. 3-18)
     
    Week 3
    Oct 8
     
     
    None Hirschhorn: Introduction (pp. 1-15), 2 (pp. 31-39)
     
    Smith & Berg: Ch. 3 (skim; pp. 46-61), 4 (pp. 62-83)
     
    (Optional for additional background: Smith & Berg, Ch. 2, pp. 19-45)
     
    Week 4
    Oct 15
     
     
    None Hirschhorn: Ch. 3 (pp. 40-56)
     
    Smith & Berg: Ch. 5 (pp. 89-108), 9 (pp. 182-203)
     
    Week 5
    Oct 22
     
     
    None Hirschhorn: Ch. 4 (pp. 57-70)
     
    Smith & Berg: Ch. 6 (pp. 109-130)
     
    Week 6
    Oct 29
     
     
    None Hirschhorn: Ch. 6 (pp. 106-139)
     
    Smith & Berg: Ch. 7 (pp. 131-151), 8 (pp. 152-181)
     
    Week 7
    Nov 5
     
     
    None Hirschhorn: Ch. 10 (pp. 201-216), 12 (pp. 231-241)
     
    Smith & Berg: Ch. 11 (pp. 231-265)
     
    Week 8
    Nov 12
     
    TBD TBD
    Week 9
    Nov 19
     
    TBD TBD
    Week 10
    Nov 26
     
    TBD
    Week 11
    Dec 3
     
    TBD
    Week 12
    Dec 10
     
    None
    CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, EAST BAYPOLICE DEPARTMENT
    25800 Carlos Bee Boulevard, Hayward CA  94542
    (510) 885-3791
     
     

    TO:                         CSU East Bay Deans, Department Chairs and Faculty
     
    FROM:  Janeith Glenn-Davis
    Chief of Police
     
    DATE:                   September 21, 2009
     
    RE:                         CSUEB Safety Partners Program
     
    CSU East Bay has always provided an extremely safe environment in which to live, learn and thrive! Historically, our campuses have been amongst the safest within the CSU system. Last year, in an effort to maintain the safety/security of our campus, and as part of the University’s ongoing efforts toward crime prevention and emergency preparedness, the University Police Department (UPD) established the CSUEB Safety Partners Program.
     
    As we begin the Fall Quarter we are, once again, asking community members to join forces with the UPD by becoming our safety partners! We are especially seeking the assistance of students, as they constitute the majority population on campus.
     
    All that is required is a willingness to assist by being alert, conscientious and tenacious about maintaining a safe, secure environment for all. To become a great CSUEB Safety Partner, please review and use the safety tips presented on the attached flyer. In addition, please review the flyer and distribute it to all students registered in your classes. My request is that you attach the information to your syllabi, review it with students on the first day of class, and then post it in a conspicuous place. This is the easiest way for us to get the message to the broader CSUEB community.
     
    Thank you for your attention to this important issue and for becoming a CSUEB Safety Partner… we look forward to working with you!
     
     
     
    JGD:wd

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         CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, EAST BAY            UNIVERSITY POLICE DEPARTMENT
    25800 Carlos Bee Boulevard, Hayward, CA 94542
    (510) 885-3791
     
     

    Become a CSUEB “SAFETY PARTNER…” There’s Safety in Numbers!
     
    Be alert to your surroundings and the people around you, especially if you are alone and/or in the dark.
     
    Avoid locations and situations that could make you vulnerable to crime, such as alleys and dark areas (including parking lots).
     
    Form a “ped group”… travel to and from class (or any campus location) in a group or with a friend.
     
    Avoid door-ways, tall bushes and alleys where someone could hide.
     
    Walk with confidence, and at a steady pace; make eye contact with passersby.
     
    Other than a responsive, “hello,” do not respond to conversation from strangers, continue walking.
     
    If you carry a purse, hold it close to your body; if walking with someone, keep the purse between the two of you. Never leave your purse or billfold unattended.
     
    Have your keys in hand so you do not linger before entering your car (or residence). Always check the rear seat before entering your car; always lock car doors immediately after entering or leaving your car.
     
    If you think you are being followed, drive to a public place and sound your horn for help (the University Police Department (UPD), is open 24/7, and located directly across from WA Hall).
     
    If your car breaks down, open the hood, activate your emergency lights and attach a white cloth to the car antenna. If someone stops to help, stay in the locked car, slightly roll down the window and ask them to call a tow service or UPD.
     
    Do not stop to aid motorist stopped on the side of the road; instead, call UPD and request assistance for them.
     
    Be a proactive safety partner for the campus community; always keep your eyes/ears open and immediately report suspicious activity to UPD.
     
    Always remain alert, and don’t hesitate to call UPD if you see or hear something suspicious. Call 911or 510-885-3333 if the situation is life-threatening. Call 510-885-3791 for non-emergency issues or police escort services.

     

         CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, EAST BAY            UNIVERSITY POLICE DEPARTMENT
    25800 Carlos Bee Boulevard, Hayward CA 94542
    (510) 885-3791
     

    Active Shooter Response: A Strategy for Survival
    What is an “Active Shooter”?
    An active shooter is a person who is actively engaged in killing or attempting to kill people in a populated area.
    What should I do?
    How you respond to an active shooter will be dictated by the specific circumstances of the incident and your surroundings (bearing in mind there could be more than one shooter involved). Try to remain calm and use these guidelines to help plan a strategy for survival:
     

    • If an active shooter is outside your building: If safe to do so, exit the building or go to a room that can be locked. Close and lock all the windows and doors, turn off all the lights, get everyone down on the floor and make sure no one is visible from outside the room. Spread out, and do not huddle together for protection. Call 911 or (510) 885-3333, tell the dispatcher what is happening, and inform him/her of your location. Provide as many details as possible and don’t hang up, unless instructed to do so. Be as quiet as possible and listen. Unfamiliar voices may be a shooter attempting to lure victims from their safe space. Do not respond to any voice commands until you can verify that they are being issued by a police officer.
    • If an active shooter is in your building: If safe to do so, exit the building or go to a room that can be locked. If you cannot safely relocate, use furniture or equipment to barricade entrances. Call 911 or (510) 885-3333. Then, follow the above instructions.
    • If an active shooter enters your office or classroom: If possible, escape or hide. Dial 911 or (510) 885-3333; if you can’t speak, leave the line open so the dispatcher can listen to what’s happening. If there is no opportunity to escape or hide, consider whether to try negotiating with (or overtaking) the shooter. Consider overtaking the shooter only after all other options have been exhausted. Do not touch anything that was in the vicinity of the shooter.

    If you decide to flee… keep these instructions in mind: Have an escape route or plan in mind. Do not carry anything while fleeing; move quickly, in a “zigzag” motion. Keep your hands visible, and follow the instructions of responding officers.
     
    Call (510) 885-2000 to get updated information from the CSUEB message line.
     
    [*] Fink, L. D. (2003). Creating significant learning experiences: An integrated approach to designing college courses. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass

 
Significant Learning Objectives assignment.
Foundational knowledge
   Ability to define the terms and utilize them in the group seminar.
Application
   Providing accurate data to my team help them to complete the project
Integration
Understand the academic disciplines and combine them to complete the project
Human dimension
Give your time and your attention to complete the work in your group

  • Helping others
  • Listen and interrupt in the right way

Caring

  1. click here for more information on this paper
  • Participate in the group discussions
  • Looking for extra information if we had to

Learning how to learns

  • Trying many times till you reach out your goals.
  • Study about suggestion that you make, and try to make it better for the team.

 
 
 

 

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