Treatment of cultural or gender issues

Treatment of cultural or gender issues

write an essay of about 800 words comparing and contrasting the treatment of cultural or gender issues in any two short stories. You must submit for approval a brief statement of what stories and topic you propose to work on.

2 short story of the following:

Wendt’s “Crocodile†; Maracle’s
“Charlie†; Mansfield’s “The Garden Party’;
Ihimaera’s “This Life is Wearyâ€

Rhys’s “I Used to Live Here Once”;
Gordimer’s “Is There Nowhere Else Where We Can Meet”;
Davis’s “Pay Back”
Poe’s “The Cask of Amontilladoâ€

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What is your personal stance on the current state of victims’ rights in America

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Read 
the following two articles Crime Victims’ Rights: From Illusion to Reality and Vengeance Time in this week’s Electronic Reserve Readings.

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Write 
a 350- to 700-word personal reflection that addresses the following:

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·
What is your personal stance on the current state of victims’ rights in America?

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Do you believe that the 2004 Crime Victims’ Rights Act (CRVA) has been successful? Explain.

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Is there ever a circumstance in which you feel vengeance is appropriate, even when it means

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breaking a law? Explain your response.

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Do you agree with the actions of Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests (SNAP)? Why or why not?

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Roman","serif"; font-size: 12.0pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman";”>In November of last year, the Diocese of Wilmington, Delaware, released the names of twenty former priests about whom the diocese found credible or substantial complaints of sexual abuse of minors. Most of the twenty are dead. Edward M. Dudzinski, however, was still living–although he had not served as a priest since the 1980s–and resided in Herndon, Virginia.

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Roman","serif"; font-size: 12.0pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman";”>When local members of the Survivors Network of Those Abused by Priests (SNAP) discovered Dudzinski’s location, they went door-to-door in his neighborhood distributing a file of documents with the title Community Notification: Protect your children from a credibly accused serial sex offender, which they believed established Dudzinski’s identity as a sex offender. Dudzinski, however, has never been convicted of, or even charged with, a sexual-abuse crime.

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Roman","serif"; font-size: 12.0pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman";”>SNAP has made similar preemptive strikes elsewhere. In January 2007, Rev. Darrell Mitchell left his pastoral duties after SNAP protested his assignment to two parishes in the Archdiocese of St. Louis. While previously serving in Yakima, Washington, Mitchell had been accused of having pictures of nude boys on his computer. No charges, however, were ever filed against him, even after investigations by the FBI, other law enforcement agencies, and the Diocese of Yakima. According to a diocesan spokesman, Mitchell relocated to Missouri because he had been hounded so much despite the thoroughness of the investigations and the decision by the FBI and local agencies not to take legal action against him. Unimpressed with that decision by the legal authorities, David Clohessy, SNAP’s national director, said that Archbishop [Raymond] Burke should have removed [Mitchell], never allowed him here, and still owes Catholics an explanation for his secrecy and recklessness. Pressure from SNAP was intense enough to induce Fr. Mitchell not only to resign his pastoral duties, but to leave Missouri.

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Roman","serif"; font-size: 12.0pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman";”>In Pennsylvania, relatively stringent criminal and civil statutes of limitations had frustrated both criminal prosecution of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and the type of civil claims that have bankrupted Spokane and other dioceses. Angered by their failure to obtain a grand jury indictment, two lead prosecutors later publicly attacked the archdiocese for its alleged efforts to forestall legislative enactment of a California-style suspension of the statute of limitations to resuscitate time-barred suits, as well as other changes in the state’s child-abuse laws. The prosecutors made these public claims without producing any evidence that the archdiocese had engaged in such lobbying efforts, and without conceding that there might be reasonable arguments to be made against some aspects of the legislative package.

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Roman","serif"; font-size: 12.0pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman";”>What’s going on here? SNAP might claim that its campaigns in Herndon and St. Louis were simply pragmatic measures needed to bring justice to those deprived of it, and to protect potential victims from the ongoing threat of clergy abuse. Presumably, they would argue that the church and its priests are finally getting what they deserve after decades of indifference, deception, and obduracy. Their actions, however, suggest that more is going on. SNAP’s public campaign to expose priests who have merely been accused–or sometimes cleared–of abuse has a vigilante air about it. In their eagerness to effect justice as they know it, SNAP may in fact be disrupting the rule of law. 

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Roman","serif"; font-size: 12.0pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman";”>Likewise, the Philadelphia prosecutors’ diatribe against the archdiocese (and the front-page coverage in the Philadelphia Inquirer) served as a kind of public theater in which the prosecutors cathartically worked out their rage at not being able to indict the archdiocese and Cardinal Anthony Bevilacqua. The public, emotional, and absolutist character of all these actions expresses not only great anger and frustration, but also the desire to abase and punish. It’s vengeance time.

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Roman","serif"; font-size: 12.0pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman";”>To be sure, the bishops have brought these theatrics of vengeance on themselves. For an institution famous for its rituals and emphasis on repentance, the church has offered precious few rituals of penitence as a way of acknowledging its fault, recognizing the harm it has done, and seeking forgiveness both from God and those it has wronged. Victims have often said (probably to their lawyers’ alarm) that they would have been content with an opportunity to tell their stories, an acknowledgement of responsibility, exposure of the malefactors, and a genuine apology. The Cultrera brothers’ remarkable documentary Hand of God, recently broadcast on PBS, dramatically shows how a victim first sought only some recognition of the injuries he suffered at the hands of one of the Boston Archdiocese’s worst offenders. He sued for monetary damages only after Bishop John McCormack, one of the guiltiest diocesan officials, flat out lied to him and treated him with peremptory condescension.

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Roman","serif"; font-size: 12.0pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman";”>No wonder the extraordinary proposed settlement of the Diocese of Spokane bankruptcy requires Bishop William Skylstad not only to publish the names of all credibly accused priests (which has already been done elsewhere), but also to appear at the pulpit in every parish where an abusive priest served, and provide every victim an opportunity to speak out publicly in the parish where he was abused. What’s more, Skylstad must publicly call for eliminating statutes of limitations on sex crimes against children. In the absence of voluntary gestures of penitence, victims and their advocates are extracting public humiliation.

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Roman","serif"; font-size: 12.0pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman";”>It is not enough to say, however, that bishops, priests, and the church are finally getting what they deserve. The vengeance game is a dangerous one. When the original offense is terrible, we feel empowered to do terrible things in response. Blinded by our righteous rage and convinced of our moral superiority, we may do things we later regret.

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Roman","serif"; font-size: 12.0pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman";”>The consequences of the terrible assault of 9/11 on the innocent serve as an example. The moral horror of 9/11 provided, for a while, the sense that we were entitled to transgress our own moral boundaries. Torture seemed reasonable. Equally important, it made the rule of law seem a trivial charade. Why bother with the constitutional rights of Guantánamo prisoners? Why not enact legislation invading the privacy rights of millions of Americans, if that would make it easier to punish our enemies and protect ourselves from harm? In the war on terror, it seems that anything goes. In the purity of our victimhood, we can do no wrong–or so we think until wrong has been done.

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Roman","serif"; font-size: 12.0pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman";”>Our self-righteousness makes us impatient with the law. The law’s careful balancing of rights and interests, its goal of evenhandedness, and its insistence on due process seem to be pettifoggery, mere technicalities, and an obstacle to achieving the justice we know in our hearts. This impatience with the law, however, can lead to injustice. The nauseating image of rich white jocks at Duke drugging and raping a black woman at a party led a prosecutor to abuse his prosecutorial discretion, violating the most basic rules for deciding whether to prosecute. The terrible nature of what could have happened made the prosecutor and many members of the Duke and Durham communities indifferent to the legal obligation to prove what actually happened. Who needs the rules of evidence when we somehow know that something awful took place?

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Roman","serif"; font-size: 12.0pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman";”>When the victims are children, we are even more willing to suspend our commitment to bothersome principles such as innocent until proven guilty, proof beyond a reasonable doubt, and the need for credible evidence. Take, for example, the McMartin daycare case in California in the 1980s, in which the accusations of one child’s mother–who was later diagnosed with schizophrenia–led to a ballooning, seven-year investigation of the owners and staff of the daycare center, which produced no convictions and cost millions. The alleged abuses were so vile that well-intentioned prosecutors, social workers, and psychologists apparently lost their critical faculties in trumping up charges based on highly manipulative psychological examinations of the children and dubious theories of repressed memory.

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Roman","serif"; font-size: 12.0pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman";”>To be sure, the clergy sexual-abuse cases differ from the Duke and McMartin cases in that something actually did happen, and the experiences and their consequences were in fact truly horrendous. The similarity, however, is that in both sets of cases the terrible nature of the alleged or real offenses led to impatience with, or even disregard of, the rule of law. As with the response to 9/11, we are seeing how victims, perhaps understandably, try to avoid or ignore entanglement with the legal system and take the law into their own hands.

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Roman","serif"; font-size: 12.0pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman";”>It is very hard to criticize the survivors of clergy abuse and their advocates. The survivors were indeed victims, not just of the molesters, but of the bishops and officials who ignored and deceived them, who covered up the problem and enabled further abuse. They have had to struggle bitterly to get any recognition or compensation. But their innocence cannot justify everything that survivors and advocates choose to do.

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Roman","serif"; font-size: 12.0pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman";”>In particular, it cannot justify some of the settlements that are emerging. The recently proposed settlement of the Diocese of Spokane bankruptcy is an example. The Spokane plaintiffs had the legal leverage provided by a generous statute of limitations that allowed cases to go forward that would have been time-barred elsewhere. They benefited from a highly questionable judicial decision that the diocese owned the parishes’ assets, meaning that these could be used to satisfy the diocese’s creditors, including the abuse plaintiffs. The law thus gave the diocese little bargaining power. The diocese also had limited ability to fund a defense. When it declared bankruptcy in 2004, the Diocese of Spokane listed only $11 million in assets against $75 million in liabilities, mostly abuse claims.

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Roman","serif"; font-size: 12.0pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman";”>It is therefore no wonder that the diocese ended up with a proposed settlement that would provide one of the highest per capita payments of any in the country. But that is not the only disturbing aspect of the proposed arrangement. It presumes payment of $20 million by the diocese’s insurers, who may not actually pay the full amount. In a novel provision, the parishes, or more precisely the parishioners, are expected to raise $10 million, presumably through fundraising and sales of assets. The diocese itself must contribute $18 million, to be raised in part by selling the chancery and the bishop’s residence. In addition, the assets of four Spokane parishes and a retreat center are being used as collateral for $6 million in notes from the diocese. This means that the parishes’ assets are subject to being sold if the diocese defaults on its obligation. Where the balance of the $18 million will come from is not clear. The diocese has only until October 1, 2007, to pay 80 percent of the $45.7 million, with the balance due on October 1, 2010. This is expected from a diocese that is by no means rich. The $11 million in assets it claimed in 2004 has dwindled to just over $8 million because of bankruptcy costs. Even worse, the settlement covers only seventy-five claimants, any of whom could opt out of the settlement and join at least fifteen other potential plaintiffs in separate suits.

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Roman","serif"; font-size: 12.0pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman";”>The bitterest irony of this punishing settlement, however, is that the victims are likely to receive only about half the total recovery to divide among themselves. Some will cover litigation costs. The rest will go to their lawyers.

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Roman","serif"; font-size: 12.0pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman";”>While unusually heavy, the potential impact of the settlement on the Spokane Diocese is, of course, not unique. In mid-2006 the total cost of all known settlements was about $1.5 billion. That figure included settlements of $127 million and $100 million from the Boston and Orange County dioceses, but it did not include Spokane’s proposed settlement and the recent settlements in the dioceses of Covington, Kentucky ($85 million), Portland, Oregon ($75 million), Los Angeles ($60 million), Milwaukee ($16.5 million), and Charleston, South Carolina ($12 million). What’s more, such settlements do not necessarily cap the dioceses’ potential liability. The Los Angeles settlement does not include potential settlements arising from the five hundred other suits that were not included in the $60-million settlement. Those suits extend back to the 1940s as a result of the California legislature’s suspension of the statute of limitations, which revived hundreds of time-barred suits. The number of potential suits in other jurisdictions with long or open-ended limitations periods is very hard to predict, and the potential damages cannot be calculated.

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Use the Internet or the Strayer Library to research articles on strategic management of Apple Inc. and Samsung Group

1.Analyze the existing business strategies, domestic and global environments, industry, and internal capabilities for both Apple and Samsung. Assess the significant manner in which each company’s mission and vision align with the long-terms goals and strategic direction of the organization.

2.Analyze the business-level strategy of each company by conducting a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) analysis. Next, determine the fundamental way in which each sector influences its competitive position within the industry. Provide rationale to support the response.

3.Analyze the central manner in which the strategies of each company’s business leaders have adapted to cultural differences in order to both facilitate effective operations within global markets and drive new strategic initiatives with improved innovation excellence. Provide one (1) example of such strategies in use from each company to support the response.

4.Evaluate the superiority of each company’s organizational competencies in terms of entrepreneurial capabilities, organizational design capabilities, and strategic capabilities geared toward increased performance and profitability. Include one (1) example of such superiority from each company to support the response.

5.Recommend one (1) appropriate new business strategy for each company that may maximize profitability and improved competitiveness in the industry. Provide a detailed rationale for this strategy.

6.Evaluate the success of both companies’ corporate-level strategies in terms of horizontal integration, vertical integration, strategic outsourcing, or diversification. Next, determine the type of strategy that contributed most effectively to the creation of a successful and profitable multibusiness model. Provide a detailed rationale to support the response.

7.Analyze the strategies that the internal leadership of both Apple and Samsung has taken to discourage unethical behaviors. Provide at least three (3) examples of such leadership in action from both companies to support the response.

8.Assume that both Apple and Samsung are in need of organizational change and must alter existing strategies. Recommend three (3) specific ways in which Apple and Samsung could change functional, business, and corporate strategies, as well as organizational structure and control in order to improve business performance and competitiveness in their industry. Provide a rationale to support the response.

 

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Congenital HIV

 

Congenital HIV

Introduction

  • Congenital HIV is an ailment condition which occurs during child’s birth and can appear through inheritance from parent or being fueled by environmental aspects.

Speaker notes

Actually, Congenital HIV is demonstrated as the infection which can be transmitted from mother to kids and it spreads through environmental factors. At this juncture, some motherly contagion is webbed to child hence leading to inveterate situation. Moreover, there are some features that are considered to gear increase of this condition and they include: drug or alcohol consumption, placental health and nutritional intake which is backed with higher potential of heightening habitual assaults. In exemplar, there is evidential information which dictates that mothers of about 50% of newborns infected with HIV are nattily contained with this virus. However, the evaluation of this malady is always confirmed in children who are within six months and two years.

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Week 6: Interfaces and Abstract Classes – iLab iLab 6 of 7: Abstract Class and Polymorphism

Week 6: Interfaces and Abstract Classes – iLab
iLab 6 of 7: Abstract Class and Polymorphism

i L A B  O V E R V I E W

Scenario and Summary

We have two separate goals this week:
We are going to create an abstract Employee class and two pure virtual functions – calculatePay() and displayEmployee(). The abstract Employee class will prevent a programmer from creating an object based on Employee, however, a pointer can still be created. Objects based on Salaried and Hourly will be allowed. The pure virtual function calculatePay() in Employee will force the child classes to implement calculatePay(). The other pure virtual function displayEmployee() in Employee will force the child classes to implement displayEmployee().
We are going to implement Polymorphism and dynamic binding in this iLab.
Deliverables
Due this week:
Capture the Console output window and paste it into a Word document.
Zip the project folder in the Microsoft Visual Studio.
Put the zip file and screenshots (word document) in the Dropbox.

i L A B  S T E P S

STEP 1: Understand the UML Diagram

Notice in the updated UML diagram that the Employee class is designated as abstract by having the class name Employee italicized. Also, the calculatePay method is italicized, which means that it is a pure virtual function and needs to be implemented in the derived classes. In addition, make displayEmployee() method a pure virtual function as well.

Employee #firstName : string #lastName : string #gender : char #dependents : int #annualSalary : double #benefit : Benefit -static numEmployees : int = 0 +Employee() +Employee(in fname : string, in lname : string, in gen : char, in dep : int, in benefits : Benefit) +static getNumEmployees() : int +CalculatePay() : double +displayEmployee() : void Benefit -healthinsurance : string -lifeinsurance : double -vacation : int +Benefit() +Benefit(in hins : string, in lins : double, in vac : int) +displayBenefits() : void Salaried -MIN_MANAGEMENT_LEVEL : int = 0 -MAX_MANAGEMENT_LEVEL : int = 3 -BONUS_PERCENT : double = 10 -managementLevel : int +Salaried() +Salaried(in fname : string, in lname : string, in gen : char, in dep : int, in sal : double, in ben : Benefit, in manLevel : int) +Salaried(in sal : double, in manLevel : int) +CalculatePay() : double +displayEmployee() : void Hourly -MIN_WAGE : double = 10 -MAX_WAGE : double = 75 -MIN_HOURS : double = 0 -MAX_HOURS: double = 50 -wage : double -hours : double -category : string +Hourly() +Hourly(in wage : double, in hours : double, in category : string) +Hourly(in fname : string, in lname : string, in gen : char, in dep : int, in wage : double, in hours : double, in ben : Benefit, in category : string) +CalculatePay() : double +displayEmployee() : void
STEP 2: Create the Project

Create a new project and name it CIS247C_WK6_Lab_LASTNAME. Copy all the source files from the Week 5 project into the Week 6 project.
Before you move on to the next step, build and execute the Week 6 project.
STEP 3: Modify the Employee Class

Define calculatePay() as a pure virtual function.
Define displayEmployee() as a pure virtual function.
When class Employee contains two pure virtual functions, it becomes an abstract class.
STEP 4: Create Generalized Input Methods

Reuse method getInput() from the previous iLab to prompt the user to enter Employee information.
STEP 5: Modify the Main Method

Create two employee pointers with:

Employee *employeeList1 = new Salaried(10000,3); Employee *employeeList2 = new Hourly(50, 40, “full time”);
The first employee pointer refers to a salaried employee and the second employee pointer refers to a hourly employee.
Prompt the user to enter information for these two pointers and display the calculated result.
For salaried employee, the following information needs to be displayed:
Partial Sample Output:

Screenshot of program output that reads: Employee Information ________________________________________ Name: Nana Liu Gender: F Annual Salary: 60000.00 Weekly Salary: 1500.00 Benefit Information ________________________________________ Health Insurance: PPO Life Insurance: 1.50 Vacation: 21 days Salaried Employee Management level: 3
For hourly employee, the following information needs to be displayed:
Partial Sample Output:

Screenshot of program output that reads: Name: Jackie Chan Gender: M Dependents: 1 Annual Salary: 100000.00 Weekly Salary: 2000.00 Benefit Information ________________________________________ Health Insurance: HMO Life Insurance: 100.00 Vacation: 18 days Hourly Employee Category: full time Wage: 50.00 Hours: 40.00
STEP 6: Compile and Test

When done, compile and run your code.
Then, debug any errors until your code is error-free.
Check your output to ensure that you have the desired output, modify your code as necessary, and rebuild.
Below is a complete sample program output for your reference.

Screenshot of program output that reads: Welcome to your Object Oriented Program–Employee ClassCIS247C, Week 6 LabName: Prof.Nana Liu ************** Employee 1 ************** Please enter your First Name :Nana Please enter your Last Name :Liu Please enter your Gender :Female Please enter your Dependents :2 Please enter your Annual Salary :60000 Please enter your HealthInsurance:PPO Please enter your LifeInsurance:1.5 Please enter your Vacation Days:21 Employee Information ________________________________________ Name: Nana Liu Gender: F Dependents: 2 Annual Salary: 60000.00 Weekly Salary: 1500.00 Benefit Information ________________________________________ Health Insurance: PPO Life Insurance: 1.50 Vacation: 21 days Salaried Employee Management level: 3 ************** Employee 2 ************** Please enter your First Name :Jackie Please enter your Last Name :Chan Please enter your Gender :Male Please enter your Dependents :1 Please enter your HealthInsurance:HMO Please enter your LifeInsurance:100 Please enter your Vacation Days:18 Employee Information ________________________________________ Name: Jackie Chan Gender: M Dependents: 1 Annual Salary: 100000.00 Weekly Salary: 2000.00 Benefit Information ________________________________________ Health Insurance: HMO Life Insurance: 100.00 Vacation: 18 days Category: full time Wage: 50.00 Hours: 40.00 — Number of Employee Object Created — Number of employees: 2 The end of the CIS247C Week6 iLab. Press any key to continue…
STEP 7: Submit Deliverables
CIS247 Week 6 Lab in C++
CIS247A Week 6 Lab in C++
CIS247B Week 6 Lab in C++
CIS247C Week 6 Lab in C++

iqra javaid

 

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If governments are able to decide what information to provide in the form of RSI, how reliable do you think the information is overall

If governments are able to decide what information to provide in the form of RSI, how reliable do you think the information is overall? Can they choose to only provide the positive information or are they required to report at least a minimum amount of information to be in compliance with GASB?

It would seem that the financial statements and notes to the statements would compare to those provided in a for profit company but RSI is a different set of information altogether. What types of information can we ascertain from RSI? How does demographics, etc. play a part in illustrating the fiscal health of the government entity?

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For a government do you think that this gives an accurate assessment of it’s fiscal health? What other information would make this a more comprehensive report? Does RSI bring anything additional to the table that would paint a more thorough financial picture?

When we compare businesses we know that the financial statements are going to be essentially the same and the comparison is fairly easy even if they are in different industries. How do you think the universities reporting differently would effect that comparison? Would we be able to draw the necessary parallels to get an accurate comparison?

I just need a few sentences for each question. a paragraph at the most

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Hospitality and Gastronomy in Saudi Arabia

Hospitality and Gastronomy in Saudi Arabia Report about hospitality and gastronomy in Saudi Arabia Hospitality Student’s Name: /30 Mark Content (50 marks) ? Addressed the selected topic ? Demonstrated ability to review and analyse literature on topic in a systematic and thematic manner ? Identified context of argument to the broader literature ? Presented accurate knowledge of relevant and current thought ? Demonstrated depth of coverage ? Demonstrated critical analysis and understanding of the topic ? Supported argument by relevant evidence, references and examples Written presentation (30 marks) ? Presented in an appropriate literary style with attention to spelling, grammar, punctuation and expression ? Presented an effectively structured essay with attention to: ? paragraph structure and development of argument ? overall structure with introduction and conclusion linked to the main body of the essay ? presentation including essay title, page numbers and various sections ? Demonstrated logic and clarity of exposition Referencing (20 marks) ? Utilised material from academic sources ? Included reference to academic journals and professional periodicals ? Demonstrated ability to appropriately acknowledge and reference the work of others, citing all material as according to a recognised referencing system, preferably the APA system ? Demonstrated wide and varied reading on the topic Total /100

 

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Web-based EHR.

Explore the following free Web-based EHR. You will receive your login information from

your instructor. The email you will receive will be from Practice Fusion and will state

Welcome to Practice Fusion . You will receive a username and a temporary password.

Once you have entered this information you will be asked to accept the user agreement and

then prompted to create a security question and create your own password. Contact your

instructor if you have any questions:

Source: Practice Fusion: Practice fusion. Retrieved from

https://static.practicefusion.com/apps/ehr/

Note: Make sure that you have watched the videos from the reading page to help you

become familiar with the site.

Once you have logged on click I Agree (if agreement pops up) then click on the word

charts at the top of the screen and explore the practice fusion site. There should be charts

that already exist in the EHR. Please focus your attention on the patient named Maria Test

Adult and explore the tabs to the left side of the screen looking at each one to understand

what is in this record. Go to the top right of the screen and click the button labeled to add a

patient. You will add a patient with a first name created by you and your last name. You will

create all other personal information about your patient. This will allow you the experience of

adding a patient to an electronic health record. Once you have done so please give the

patient’s name and chart number so that your addition to the EHR can be verified. Please

complete the following Assignment.

1. Please write a paper outlining your experience with the Web-based EHR.

2. What set of standards would apply to the Web-based EHR you researched in acute or ambulatory

care settings? Base your response on what you learned in Units 4 and 5 concerning standards and

regulations for EHRs or electronic information systems. Justify your reasoning for choosing these

organizations.

3. Discuss the possible challenges one would face to convince healthcare providers to use

this type of EHR.

4. What features did you see in the EHR that were helpful?

5. If shared with other facilities how can this be helpful?

6. What impressed you about the Web-based EHR?

Requirements 

? The Assignment should be a minimum of three to four pages in length, prepared in a

Microsoft Word document.

? Follow APA style format and citation guidelines, including Times New Roman 12

point font and double spacing.

? Include a title page and reference page. Length requirements do not include the title

page, and the reference page.

? This Assignment should follow the conventions of Standard American English

featuring correct grammar, punctuation, style, and mechanics.

? Include at least three references. The course textbook counts as one reference. All

sources must be scholarly. Wikipedia is an example of a resource that is not

acceptable. Use APA style for all citations including course materials.

? Your writing should be well ordered, logical, and unified, as well as original and

insightful.

 

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Health Care Provider and Faith Diversit

Health Care Provider and Faith Diversity: First Draft

Order Instructions: Health Care Provider and Faith Diversity: First Draft
1) The practice of health care providers at all levels brings you into contact with people of a variety of faiths. This calls for acceptance of a diversity of faith expressions.
2) Research three diverse faiths. Choose faiths that are less well-known than mainstream faiths or are less known to you, such as Sikh, Bahai, BuIDhism, Shintoism, Native American, etc. Compare the philosophy of providing care from the perspective of each of these three faiths with that of the Christian perspective and your own personal perspective.
3) In a minimum of 1250 words, summarize your findings and compare and contrast the different belief systems, reinforcing major themes with insights gained from your research.
a) Some of the questions to consider when researching the chosen religions are:
i) What is the spiritual perspective on healing?
ii) What are the critical components of healing, such as prayer, meditation, belief, etc?
iii) What is important to people of a particular faith when cared for by health care providers whose spiritual beliefs differ from their own?
iv) How do patients view health care providers who are able to let go of their own beliefs in the interest of the beliefs and practices of the patient? Compare these beliefs to the Christian philosophy of faith and healing.

……………………………………….

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Comparing not quite shamans and ghost riders of upper egypt

compare and contrast between the societies in theses two books: ‘Ghost Rides of Upper Egypt: a study of spirit possession’ by Hans A. Wickler, and ‘Not Quite Shamans: spirit worlds and political lives in nothern mangolia’ by Morton Pederesen. this paper should consist of 4 different parts: 1. focus on habits, customs, beliefs, and institutions of societies in the two books 2. explain theoretical orientation of the authors 3. explain the methodology of the authors 4. use sufficient evidence appropriately. paper must be clearly organized, have a clear thesis statement, free of errors, and be well-written. No outside sources/references necessary, only footnotes from the two books.

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